This year, World No Tobacco Day focuses on protecting youth from industry manipulation and preventing them from tobacco and nicotine use.

    For decades, the tobacco industry has deliberately employed strategic, aggressive and well-resourced tactics to attract youth to tobacco and nicotine products. Internal industry documents reveal in-depth research and calculated approaches designed to attract a new generation of tobacco users, from product design to marketing campaigns aimed at replacing the millions of people who die each year from tobacco-attributable diseases with new consumers – youth. 

    In response to the tobacco and related industries’ systematic, aggressive and sustained tactics to attract a new generation of tobacco users, World No Tobacco Day 2020 will provide a counter-marketing campaign and empower young people to engage in the fight against Big Tobacco.

    Tobacco products kill more than 8 million people every year.

    Tobacco and related industries’ tactics to market to children and adolescents include:

    • Over 15,000 flavours, most of which attract children and adolescents
    • Social media influencers and marketing
    • Sponsored events and parties
    • School scholarships
    • Sleek, sexy designs
    • Product placement in entertainment media
    • Free product samples
    • Single stick cigarettes make addiction more affordable
    • Selling products at eye level for children 
    • Product placement and advertising near schools

    Find out more about World No Tobacco Day 2020 here

    Read the FIRS statement on electronic cigarette use in youths

    Source: World Health Organisation 

     



    Image: WHO Headquarters in Geneva  ©WHO: P.VIrot .

    The Forum of International Respiratory Societies urges governments around the world to continue to support the World Health Organization (WHO) in the fight against COVID-19.

    “More now than ever, the world’s nations need to band together and pool resources in order to fight this global pandemic.  Defunding WHO at such a critical time in our history is a dangerous step in the wrong direction.  FIRS urges the United States government and President Trump to immediately reconsider its decision,” said Stephanie Levine, MD President of FIRS.

    The Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) is an organisation comprised of the world's leading international respiratory societies working together to improve lung health globally: American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST), American Thoracic Society (ATS), Asian Pacific Society of Respirology (APSR), Asociación Latino Americana De Tórax (ALAT), European Respiratory Society (ERS), International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (The Union), Pan African Thoracic Society (PATS), Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA), and the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD).

    The goal of FIRS is to unify and enhance efforts to improve lung health through the combined work of its more than 70,000 members globally.

    Contact for media This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

     


    Latest updates w/c 25 May 2020

    FIRS Society Webinars

    FIRS has issued a statement urging governments around the world to continue supporting the World Health Organisation. Read the statement here

    COVID-19

    The World Health Organization (WHO) describe coronaviruses as a large family of viruses that can cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases like Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is a new strain that has not been identified in humans before.

    Coronaviruses are zoonotic, meaning they are transmitted between animals and people. Detailed investigations found that SARS-CoV was transmitted from civet cats to humans and MERS-CoV from dromedary camels to humans. Several known coronaviruses are circulating in animals that have not yet infected humans.

    What are the symptoms?

    • Mild symptoms are cold-like in presentation-- including fever, cough, and shortness of breath.
    • Older adults and people with underlying health conditions may be at increased risk for severe disease. In these more severe cases, infection can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure, and even death.

    How can coronavirus be prevented?

    There are currently no vaccines for COVID-19. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the following everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, including:

    • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
    • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
    • Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
    • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
    • Stay home when you are sick.
    • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
    • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

    WHO also recommends avoiding close contact with anyone showing symptoms of respiratory illness, such as coughing and sneezing, and thoroughly cooking eggs and meat.

    Resources from FIRS Societies

    Our international respiratory societies have produced some excellent COVID-19 materials, view the latest updates this week or click to view all resources by society:

    Links to all COVID-19 Resources

    Keep updated with the very latest information from:


    In support of World TB Day, 24 March, the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) urges governments to promote tuberculosis (TB) prevention as a critical component of TB elimination.

    TB is the leading infectious disease killer worldwide, accounting for 1.5 million deaths in 2018 alone, according to the World Health Organization’s (WHO) 2019 Global TB Report. An additional 10 million people fell ill with TB in 2018.

    Despite significant progress against TB in recent years, many people struggle to receive the treatment and care they need for reasons ranging from gaps in research and development and insufficient or underfunded health services, to long and difficult treatments or because of stigma. In addition, a quarter of the world’s population is estimated to be living with TB infection, the bacteria that causes the disease. People with TB infection are estimated to have a 5-10 percent chance of developing the disease over their lifetime but TB preventive therapy reduces a person’s risk of developing active TB by 60 to 90 percent.

    The Sustainable Development Goals set a target to end the global TB epidemic by 2030 and at the United Nations High-Level Meeting on TB in 2018, world leaders committed to reaching at least 30 million people with preventive therapy by 2022. To do this, governments must ensure people have access to diagnosis and appropriate care at the earliest stage after exposure to TB and ensure populations at higher risk of developing TB, such as young children and people living with HIV, are pro-actively treated with preventive measures.  

    FIRS calls for urgent action to advance TB prevention through rapid scale up of access to preventive treatment for TB infection for those most at risk of falling ill of TB including:

    • Four million children under five years of age
    • 20 million other household contacts of people affected by TB
    • Six million people living with HIV and AIDS.

    “Globally, we are falling short of targets”, said Dr. Grania Brigden, Director of the TB Department at the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (The Union) a FIRS founding member. “Only 27 percent of children who were eligible for preventive treatment in 2018 actually received it, and 49 percent of people newly enrolled in HIV treatment received TB preventive treatment.”

    Dr. Grania Brigden concludes, “This is an area which has long been neglected. By offering preventive therapies to those who need it we are not only preventing them from experiencing the long treatments for TB but we are also preventing future lung damage and ensuring people and their families can remain TB free.”

    Rapid scale up of TB prevention measures must be a priority element in national TB eradication strategies.

    About the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS)

    The Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) is an organisation comprised of the world's leading international respiratory societies working together to improve lung health globally: American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST), American Thoracic Society (ATS), Asian Pacific Society of Respirology (APSR), Asociación Latino Americana De Tórax (ALAT), European Respiratory Society (ERS), International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (The Union), Pan African Thoracic Society (PATS), Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA), and the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD)

    The goal of FIRS is to unify and enhance efforts to improve lung health through the combined work of its more than 70,000 members globally.

     


    WLD logo final large

    The Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) would like to thank all organisations who have pledged to support World Lung Day (WLD).

    WLD falls on 25th September and is a day to rally advocacy for respiratory health and air quality globally. You can see the full list of organisations supporting WLD 2020 below.

    No signed up yet?

    If you would like to support WLD please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    View WLD partner logos below or view the World Lung Day partner list.

    The 2020 WLD toolkit will be available soon. 


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